useful chamber

policymic:

I was shot 4 times in the Virginia Tech massacre, deadliest in US history

Since Colin Goddard’s parents both worked in the field of international development, he grew up all over the world. He was born in Kenya, and lived in Somalia, Bangladesh and Indonesia. Goddard, 28, was a high school student in Cairo during the Sept. 11 attacks. His family members back in the U.S. always worried about his safety, so they were thrilled and relieved when he returned to the U.S. in 2003 to attend Virginia Tech. But it was there, in Blacksburg, Va. — not in Nairobi, Mogadishu or Cairo — that he faced the most dangerous, horrific situation of his life.
It was a typical Monday morning during the spring of his fourth year, April 2007. Goddard was going about his Monday morning routine, making his way to his 9 a.m. French class in Norris Hall. He picked up his friend Kristina in his black Acura Integra, the two arrived a few minutes late and found seats a few rows back.
About halfway through class, Goddard’s friend, Rachael, came in and quickly sat down in an available seat in front. It was out of character for her to be so late; she was one of the best students. She whispered to a few people behind her that her dorm had been on lockdown after a supposed shooting that morning. (Records indicate that the shooting had occurred around 7:15 a.m., and two students were killed.)
It wasn’t the first time the school experienced a security incident. In fact, on the first day of class that year, the entire campus was on lockdown because William Morva, an escaped convict, was thought to be roaming in the school’s vicinity. He was caught and no students were harmed.
About five minutes after Rachael came into class, Goddard described hearing a “bang, bang, bang,” but was sure it was coming from outside. The teacher paused and looked concerned, but the students told her that it was probably just the nearby building that was under construction.
About a minute later, the blasts were much closer. The teacher cracked the wooden door open to peek out. “This time,” Goddard said, “her expression dropped.” She told everyone to get down and told someone to call for help. Goddard dialed 911 for the first time in his life. When someone picked up, he hurriedly stated, “Norris Hall,” assuming he’d been connected to a local emergency line. But the person had no idea what Norris Hall was. “Norris Hall, Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, Virginia. America!” He tried to stay calm, but he was in complete disbelief of the words about to come out of his own mouth: Someone was shooting a gun in their building.
Seconds later, bullets were coming through the door. In the instant before he dove down, he caught a glimpse of a figure — a flash of brown combat boots, khakis and a holster over each shoulder.
Goddard dropped down on his right side between two rows of desk chairs. He kept 911 on the line. At this point in his recollection, his words slowed and his voice became somber. “Then he turned down our row.”
He was shot just above his left knee. There was a fleeting “sharp sting,” he said. “I felt it in my whole body.” He smelled the gunpowder, which he thought smelled like fireworks. “I knew at that moment I’d been shot.” But almost immediately, an intense numbness overcame his entire body. “There was no pain. … It was surreal.” (In the 911 recording, Goddard is heard saying, “I’m hit,” and cursing into the phone. His parents relayed this to him. He has never listened to the recording.)
The shooter left the classroom, but was not finished. He would return two more times. The second time, he was “more methodical,” going up and down each row of desks. He approached Goddard again, and fired another shot. This time, into his left hip. The cell phone, still on the line with 911, flew out of his hand. Emily, a classmate lying nearby, picked up the phone and covered it with her hair to quiet the voices on the other end.
Goddard’s sense of time was warped, but otherwise, he was “very much aware” of what was happening. “I was in total shock and disbelief. … There were times I closed my eyes, just trying to be somewhere else.” His body remained numb and he kept his eyes closed, but his other senses became heightened. His hearing was acute. “I heard this … I’ll never forget … this deep gurgling sound.” He is almost certain it was the sound of somebody dying. He never found out who it was. He didn’t want to.
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policymic:

I was shot 4 times in the Virginia Tech massacre, deadliest in US history

Since Colin Goddard’s parents both worked in the field of international development, he grew up all over the world. He was born in Kenya, and lived in Somalia, Bangladesh and Indonesia. Goddard, 28, was a high school student in Cairo during the Sept. 11 attacks. His family members back in the U.S. always worried about his safety, so they were thrilled and relieved when he returned to the U.S. in 2003 to attend Virginia Tech. But it was there, in Blacksburg, Va. — not in Nairobi, Mogadishu or Cairo — that he faced the most dangerous, horrific situation of his life.

It was a typical Monday morning during the spring of his fourth year, April 2007. Goddard was going about his Monday morning routine, making his way to his 9 a.m. French class in Norris Hall. He picked up his friend Kristina in his black Acura Integra, the two arrived a few minutes late and found seats a few rows back.

About halfway through class, Goddard’s friend, Rachael, came in and quickly sat down in an available seat in front. It was out of character for her to be so late; she was one of the best students. She whispered to a few people behind her that her dorm had been on lockdown after a supposed shooting that morning. (Records indicate that the shooting had occurred around 7:15 a.m., and two students were killed.)

It wasn’t the first time the school experienced a security incident. In fact, on the first day of class that year, the entire campus was on lockdown because William Morva, an escaped convict, was thought to be roaming in the school’s vicinity. He was caught and no students were harmed.

About five minutes after Rachael came into class, Goddard described hearing a “bang, bang, bang,” but was sure it was coming from outside. The teacher paused and looked concerned, but the students told her that it was probably just the nearby building that was under construction.

About a minute later, the blasts were much closer. The teacher cracked the wooden door open to peek out. “This time,” Goddard said, “her expression dropped.” She told everyone to get down and told someone to call for help. Goddard dialed 911 for the first time in his life. When someone picked up, he hurriedly stated, “Norris Hall,” assuming he’d been connected to a local emergency line. But the person had no idea what Norris Hall was. “Norris Hall, Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, Virginia. America!” He tried to stay calm, but he was in complete disbelief of the words about to come out of his own mouth: Someone was shooting a gun in their building.

Seconds later, bullets were coming through the door. In the instant before he dove down, he caught a glimpse of a figure — a flash of brown combat boots, khakis and a holster over each shoulder.

Goddard dropped down on his right side between two rows of desk chairs. He kept 911 on the line. At this point in his recollection, his words slowed and his voice became somber. “Then he turned down our row.”

He was shot just above his left knee. There was a fleeting “sharp sting,” he said. “I felt it in my whole body.” He smelled the gunpowder, which he thought smelled like fireworks. “I knew at that moment I’d been shot.” But almost immediately, an intense numbness overcame his entire body. “There was no pain. … It was surreal.” (In the 911 recording, Goddard is heard saying, “I’m hit,” and cursing into the phone. His parents relayed this to him. He has never listened to the recording.)

The shooter left the classroom, but was not finished. He would return two more times. The second time, he was “more methodical,” going up and down each row of desks. He approached Goddard again, and fired another shot. This time, into his left hip. The cell phone, still on the line with 911, flew out of his hand. Emily, a classmate lying nearby, picked up the phone and covered it with her hair to quiet the voices on the other end.

Goddard’s sense of time was warped, but otherwise, he was “very much aware” of what was happening. “I was in total shock and disbelief. … There were times I closed my eyes, just trying to be somewhere else.” His body remained numb and he kept his eyes closed, but his other senses became heightened. His hearing was acute. “I heard this … I’ll never forget … this deep gurgling sound.” He is almost certain it was the sound of somebody dying. He never found out who it was. He didn’t want to.

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Let us remember those who lost their lives and loved ones in the Virginia Tech massacre 04/16/07. Let us remember that school shootings only continue to occur. Let us remember to advocate for gun control so that innocent lives are not lost like this when it could be prevented.


nothingbutamother:

dynastylnoire:

ladycedar:

There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives.
Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly.
After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down.
Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them.

art therapy is important.

You are exactly the teacher they need. It’s a brilliant idea and im so glad it works for them.
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nothingbutamother:

dynastylnoire:

ladycedar:

There are a number of students in my GCSE class that have behavioural issues and if they feel uncomfortable they can do anything from storm out of the classroom to throwing chairs and punching their tables. They’re great kids, they just dont always see the light at the end of the tunnel and when they are in stressful situations they dont know what to do other than lash out sometimes. They are 10 months away from their final exams and the pressure is being mounted on them in every aspect of their school lives.

Last week one of the students saw me making little origami stars. Its something I do when I’m feeling anxious to help me focus on something else. He asked if I could show him how to make them. He had been clenching his fists all lesson, which I’ve noticed is a tell that he is struggling to retain composure. I gave him a strip of paper and talked it through with him. Soon half of the class were asking me to show them. They all picked it up really quickly.

After about five minutes and about 8 stars later, the student sat back down and was in a much calmer and motivated mood for the rest of the lesson. Our next lesson I placed a box of paper strips on my desk and when I saw anyone getting worked up about their work I silently placed a strip in front of them and let them get on with it. The lesson after I was amazed to see that students would go up to the box of their own accord, pick up a few strips and head back to their desks to continue working after calming down.

Yesterday I brought a large jar into the classroom and placed my anxiety stars in there. The boys put their strsss stars in there too. When they fill the jar I’m going to bring sweets into the lesson to celebrate them working hard and working through their problems in a positive manner. I know I’m not the teacher they deserve just yet but I feel like I’ve made a big breakthrough with them.

art therapy is important.

You are exactly the teacher they need. It’s a brilliant idea and im so glad it works for them.